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Rwanda
Welcome to Rwanda We are a landlocked East African country with a green, mountainous landscape. Our renowned Volcanoes National Park is home to mountain gorillas and golden monkeys. The park encompasses 4,507m-tall Mt. Karisimbi and 4 other forested volcanoes. In the southwest is Nyungwe National Park, with ancient montane rainforest that's a habitat for chimpanzeesand other primates. Kigali, the nation's capital, has a vibrant restaurant and nightlife scene. The Kigali Genocide Memorial documents the 1994 mass killings in Rwanda, associated with the civil war that ended the same year. In the northeast, bordering Tanzania, is sprawling Akagera National Park and its savannah – uncommon in Rwanda – which shelters wildlife including zebras, giraffes, hippos and elephants. Deep, crystal-clear Lake Kivu sits on the country’s western border with Democratic Republic of the Congo. On the lake's northern shore is Gisenyi and its beach resorts. Spanning on a 160 sqkm area in the northern part of Ruanda, Volcanoes national park is part of the great Virunga volcano conservation region spanning to cover Virunga national park Congo and Mgahinga national park Uganda. It was initially a small area around Karisimbi, Mikeno and Visoke volcanoes which was gazetted to protect the Mountain gorillas which were facing the threat of extinction as a result of poaching. In 1929, the Volcanoes National Park was extended into Rwanda and the then Belgian Congo and was named Albert national park managed and run by the Belgian Colonial Authorities. During early 1960s, the park was divided as Rwanda and Congo gained their independence and by the end of that decade, the park was almost half of its original size. In 1967, the American zoologist Dian Fossey who had been doing research on mountain Gorillas in the forests of Congo fled from insecurity and established her research base at a place between Visoke and Karisimbi volcanoes that was yet to be known as Karisoke research center. She spearheaded the conservation campaign of the mountain gorillas and mobilized resources to fight against poaching in this area, a fight she put up until her murder in 1985. She was buried at the research center next to the grave of her favorite gorilla called Digit.
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Namibia
We are located in southwest Africa, distinguished by the Namib Desert along our Atlantic Ocean coast. Our country is home to diverse wildlife, including a significant cheetah population. The capital, Windhoek, and coastal town Swakopmund contain German colonial-era buildings such as Windhoek's Christuskirche, built in 1907. In the north, EtoshaNational Park’s salt pan draws game including rhinos and giraffes. Orange dunes loom above 500-year-old camelthorn trees in Sossusvlei, while arid conditions on the Skeleton Coast have preserved the many ships wrecked on its shores. Walvis Bay is a beach town best known for its fishing and adventure sports such as shark-angling and kiteboarding. Rugged Fish River Canyon offers more adventures, which includes a hiking trail that requires a doctor’s clearance. Prehistoric rock engravings at Twyfelfontein depict an array of wildlife still found in the area. With remote attractions and a sparse population. The Windhoek's christuskirche Best time to visit Namibia The wonders of our country are best experienced during Summer, that is  (Nov–Apr). This is a warm and sunny season everywhere. Dec is peak beach season at Walvis Bay and Swakopmund. Summer is also rainy season inland, including at Windhoek. Rain is rare at any time in coastal and desert areas, including Walvis Bay. Winter (May–Aug) is mild. Coastal regions are cooler than the interior, and sea breezes are common. Oktoberfest (Windhoek, Oct) is celebrated in traditional German style, with gusto, pork, pretzels and lots of beer. Namib Desert The People and History of Namibia Namibia, the driest country in Sub-Saharan Africa has been inhabited since early times by the San, Damara, and Nama peoples. Since the 14th century, immigrating Bantu peoples arrived as part of the Bantu expansion. Since then the Bantu groups in total, one of which is known as the Ovambo people, have dominated the population of our country and since the late 19th century, have constituted a majority. In 1878 the Cape of Good Hope then a British colony had annexed the port of Walvis Bay and the offshore Penguin Islands; these became an integral part of the new Union of South Africa at its creation in 1910. In 1884, the German Empire established rule over most of the territory as a protectorate (Schutzgebiet). It began to develop infrastructure and farming, and maintained this German colony until 1915, when South African forces defeated its military. In 1920, after the end of World War I, the League of Nations mandated the country to the United Kingdom, under administration by South Africa. It imposed its laws, including racial classifications and rules. From 1948, with the National Party elected to power, South Africa applied apartheid also to what was then known as South West Africa. In the later 20th century, uprisings and demands for political representation by native African political activists seeking independence resulted in the UN assuming direct responsibility over the territory in 1966, but South Africa maintained de facto rule. In 1973 the UN recognised the South West Africa People's Organisation (SWAPO) as the official representative of the Namibian people; the party is dominated by the Ovambo, who are a large majority in the territory. Following continued guerrilla warfare, South Africa installed an interim administration in Namibia in 1985. Namibia obtained full independence from South Africa in 1990. However, Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands remained under South African control until 1994. Namibia has a population of 2.6 million people and a stable multi-party parliamentary democracy. Agriculture, herding, tourism and the mining industry – including mining for gem diamonds, uranium, gold, silver, and base metals – form the basis of its economy. The large, arid Namib Desert has resulted in Namibia being overall one of the least densely populated countries in the world.
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Ethiopia
Ethiopia, in the Horn of Africa, is a rugged, landlocked country split by the Great Rift Valley. With archaeological finds dating back more than 3 million years, it’s a place of ancient culture. Among its important sites are Lalibela with its rock-cut Christian churches from the 12th–13th centuries. Aksum is the ruins of an ancient city with obelisks, tombs, castles and Our Lady Mary of Zion church. In the capital, Addis Ababa, the National Museum displays art and archaeology collections, while the Ethnological Museum has tribal artifacts. Copper-domed Holy Trinity Cathedral is where Emperor Haile Selassie was buried in 1975. The Fasil Ghebbi castle complex, once the seat of Ethiopian emperors, is in Gondar. Harar is a mazelike walled town with numerous mosques. Lake Tana is the Blue Nile River’s source, with the Blue Nile Falls flowing nearby. Less-traveled Bale Mountains National Park is noted for its native wildlife. Hiking routes mark Simien Mountains National Park, an endangered-species habitat. Photo by Vahe Tilbian When to visit Peak travel months include Jul–Aug and Oct–Jan. Ethiopia’s climate ranges from mild in the highlands to very hot in the desert lowlands. For much of the country, the rainy season is Jun–Sep, with mainly dry weather the rest of the year. Timkat (Jan) is the Ethiopian Orthodox Epiphany, with baptismal reenactments. Enkutatash (Sep), the Ethiopian New Year at the end of the rainy season, is marked by singing and bouquets of yellow flowers. The Festival of Maryam Zion (Nov) is a Christian pilgrimage to Aksum’s famous church.
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Nigeria
  Nigeria, officially the Federal Republic of Nigeria (/naɪˈdʒɪəriə/ (About this sound listen)) is a federal republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea in the Atlantic Ocean. It comprises 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory, where the capital, Abuja is located. Nigeria is officially a democratic secular country.[6] Nigeria has been home to a number of kingdoms and tribal states over the millennia. The modern state originated from British colonial rule beginning in the 19th century, and took its present territorial shape with the merging of the Southern Nigeria Protectorate and Northern Nigeria Protectorate in 1914. The British set up administrative and legal structures whilst practising indirect rule through traditional chiefdoms. Nigeria became a formally independent federation in 1960. It experienced a civil war from 1967 to 1970. It thereafter alternated between democratically elected civilian governments and military dictatorships until it achieved a stable democracy in 1999, with the 2011 presidential election considered the first to be reasonably free and fair.[7] Nigeria is often referred to as the "Giant of Africa", owing to its large population and economy.[8] With 186 million inhabitants, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous country in the world. Nigeria has the third-largest youth population in the world, after India and China, with more than 90 million of its population under age 18.[9][10] The country is viewed as a multinational state as it is inhabited by over 500 ethnic groups, of which the three largest are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba; these ethnic groups speak over 500 different languages and are identified with a wide variety of cultures.[11][12] The official language is English. Nigeria is divided roughly in half between Christians, who live mostly in the southern part of the country, and Muslims, who live mostly in the north. A minority of the population practise religions indigenous to Nigeria, such as those native to the Igbo and Yoruba ethnicities. As of 2015, Nigeria is the world's 20th largest economy, worth more than $500 billion and $1 trillion in terms of nominal GDP and purchasing power parity respectively. It overtook South Africa to become Africa's largest economy in 2014.[13][14] The 2013 debt-to-GDP ratio was 11 percent.[15] Nigeria is considered to be an emerging market by the World Bank;[16] it has been identified as a regional power on the African continent,[17][18][19] a middle power in international affairs,[20][21][22][23] and has also been identified as an emerging global power.[24][25][26] However, it currently has a "low" Human Development Index, ranking 152nd in the world. Nigeria is a member of the MINT group of countries, which are widely seen as the globe's next "BRIC-like" economies. It is also listed among the "Next Eleven" economies set to become among the biggest in the world. Nigeria is a founding member of the African Union and a member of many other international organizations, including the United Nations, the Commonwealth of Nations and OPEC.
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South Africa
South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded on the south by 2,798 kilometres (1,739 mi) of coastline of Southern Africa stretching along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans;[9][10][11] on the north by the neighbouring countries of Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe; and on the east and northeast by Mozambique and Swaziland; and surrounds the kingdom of Lesotho.[12] South Africa is the largest country in Southern Africa[13] and the 25th-largest country in the world by land area and, with close to 56 million people, is the world's 24th-most populous nation. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World or the Eastern Hemisphere. About 80 percent of South Africans are of Sub-Saharan African ancestry,[5]divided among a variety of ethnic groups speaking different African languages, nine of which have official status.[11] The remaining population consists of Africa's largest communities of European (white), Asian (Indian), and multiracial (Coloured) ancestry. South Africa is a multiethnic society encompassing a wide variety of cultures, languages, and religions. Its pluralistic makeup is reflected in the constitution's recognition of 11 official languages, which is among the highest number of any country in the world.[11]Two of these languages are of European origin: Afrikaans developed from Dutch and serves as the first language of most white and coloured South Africans; English reflects the legacy of British colonialism, and is commonly used in public and commercial life, though it is fourth-ranked as a spoken first language.[11] The country is one of the few in Africa never to have had a coup d'état, and regular elections have been held for almost a century. However, the vast majority of black South Africans were not enfranchised until 1994. During the 20th century, the black majority sought to recover its rights from the dominant white minority, with this struggle playing a large role in the country's recent history and politics. The National Party imposed apartheid in 1948, institutionalising previous racial segregation. After a long and sometimes violent struggle by the African National Congress and other anti-apartheid activists both inside and outside the country, the repeal of discriminatory laws began in 1990. Since 1994, all ethnic and linguistic groups have held political representation in the country's democracy, which comprises a parliamentary republic and nine provinces. South Africa is often referred to as the "rainbow nation" to describe the country's multicultural diversity, especially in the wake of apartheid.[14] The World Bank classifies South Africa as an upper-middle-income economy, and a newly industrialised country.[15][16] Its economy is the second-largest in Africa, and the 34th-largest in the world.[6] In terms of purchasing power parity, South Africa has the seventh-highest per capita income in Africa. However, poverty and inequality remain widespread, with about a quarter of the population unemployed and living on less than US$1.25 a day.[17][18] Nevertheless, South Africa has been identified as a middle power in international affairs, and maintains significant regional influence
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2 Recommendations
Kampala
Kampala is Uganda's national and commercial capital bordering Lake Victoria, Africa's largest lake. Hills covered with red-tile villas and trees surround an urban centre of contemporary skyscrapers. In this downtown area, the Uganda Museum explores the country's tribal heritage through an extensive collection of artefacts. On nearby Mengo Hill is Lubiri Palace, the former seat of the Buganda Kingdom. Google photo by Wamala Medy The National Theatre hosts music, dance and film events, and has an adjacent complex selling local crafts. Lively Owino and Nakasero markets sell food alongside shoes and secondhand clothes. The latter is at the bottom of Nakasero Hill, Kampala's business and government centre. South of the city, British colonial town Entebbe offers beaches, plus boating and fishing trips on Lake Victoria. Kampala is also a gateway for exploring the rest of Uganda, from Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, a mountain gorilla refuge, to Queen Elizabeth National Park, whose wetlands, rainforests and plains shelter lions and elephants. WHEN TO VISIT Kampala is a year-round destination. Although near the Equator, its weather is cooled by its highland setting. Peak season is Dec–Jan when many tourists head off on safari around the country. This period, alongside Jun–Aug, is the dry season. There are usually heavy rains Mar–May and Oct–Nov. The Bayimba International Festival of the Arts (Sep) is a celebration of Ugandan music, art, film and theatre. The huge Kampala City Festival (Oct) offers colourful street parades, music and a vibrant party atmosphere. Photo from Googe by Environment
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Footsteps Furniture
  HOW WE WORK We suppy very high quality furniture that is comfortable and durable. We guarantee you value for money. Some of our furniture is imported from abroad e.g. China, UAE- Dubai, Malaysia, India, Vietnam, Singapore, Indonesia & Thailand. This helps us to offer better prices and good quality items. In our state-of-the-art workshop, we design and produce furniture to suit our customers requirements for example: Work stations, Office tables in all sizes and colour, Kitchen Units, Wardrobes, Wall mounted shelves, Office partitions etc. We at Footsteps are humbled and proud to be associated with the furnishing of Kigali Convention Center  that hosted the African Union Summit 2016. The project was skillfully and professionally handled. This was a big project for us and it’s success depended on our team work and dedication, we are happy that it all become a success We provide the best Quality of products to you.We are always here to help our lovely customers.We ship our products anywhere with more secure. We provide the best Quality of products to you.We are always here to help our lovely customers.We ship our products anywhere with more secure.to help our lovely customers. We provide the best Quality of products to you.We are always here to help our lovely customers.We ship our products anywhere with more secure.to help our lovely customers.   We provide the best Quality of products to you.We are always here to help our lovely customers.We ship our products anywhere with more secure. We provide the best Quality of products to you.We are always here to help our lovely customers.We ship our products anywhere with more secure.to help our lovely customers. We provide the best Quality of products to you.We are always here to help our lovely customers.We ship our products anywhere with more secure.to help our lovely customers.
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